Library

Cats + Care & Wellness

  • Online shopping for convenience and great prices has quickly become the new normal in today's consumerism society. Although technology may help us be savvy shoppers, it's still good to be cautious about what you purchase online, especially when it comes to your pet's medications.

  • A cesarean section is a surgery to remove kittens from the uterus and is most commonly performed as an emergency procedure when there is difficulty with natural birth. During the immediate recovery period, the mother and kittens must be closely monitored and begin eating/nursing within a few hours. If you have any concerns about their health, you should immediately have your veterinarian examine the kittens and their mother.

  • Chin acne in cats is a poorly understood disorder of follicular keratinization (the overproduction of keratin, a protein found in the outer layer of skin). If this excess keratin is trapped in the hair follicle, comedones (blackheads) form. Pustules (pimples) may form if bacteria infect the comedones. The underlying causes are not fully understood but may be associated with excess sebum production, viral infection, immunosuppression, stress, or poor grooming. Treatment options are available and often involve improved hygiene.

  • Your cat's skin and coat condition are good indicators of her health. A healthy coat should be shiny and smooth, not brittle or coarse, and healthy skin should be supple and clear, not greasy, flaky, or bumpy. Selective breeding has led to the development of cats with various coat characteristics requiring varying grooming needs. To maintain healthy skin and coat, your cat also requires a properly balanced diet.

  • Cats who are overweight have an increased risk of many health conditions including diabetes, arthritis, high blood pressure, and some forms of cancer. Your veterinarian can recommend a weight loss plan include a specific weight loss diet and exercise. This article discusses many tips to discourage begging and help promote healthy weight loss in cats who live in a multi-cat household.

  • Hospitals providing curbside care have restructured their practice to avoid the need for clients to enter the lobby and exam rooms. This is designed to promote physical (social) distancing and reduce the spread of COVID-19. Curbside care offers a number of benefits for you and your pet. By eliminating the need for you to enter the hospital, potential COVID-19 outbreaks are reduced. The veterinary team is protected under a curbside care model, and in turn, so is your pet. Even in curbside care, you will have an opportunity to speak with your veterinarian in order to discuss findings and recommendations. To help the curbside appointment go smoothly, bring a written list of concerns or fill in any forms your practice has sent to you prior to the appointment. Curbside care truly is in the best interests of you and your pet.

  • Cuterebra is the scientific name for the North American rabbit or rodent botfly. Cats are accidental hosts of Cuterebra larvae, and they are rarely evident from external skin inspection. A hole enlarges when the warble has matured, often leading to an infected empty cyst. Treatment depends on when the condition is discovered, and in many cases, antibiotics are used to treat secondary infections.

  • Cat food labels can certainly be confusing to interpret. In the United States, the Association of American Feed Control Officials (AAFCO) has developed model laws and regulations that states use for animal feeds. In Canada, pet food labeling guidelines are regulated by the Consumer Packaging and Labeling Act administered by Industry Canada. The Canadian government's Competition Bureau also has an extensive working group that upholds a voluntary code of conduct for the labeling and advertising of pet food. The most important information when comparing one dog food to another is the guaranteed analysis. Ingredient lists are somewhat useful when evaluating a particular cat food, but it is important to recognize the limitations. Talk to you veterinarian about the ingredient list and nutrient profile to help choose the diet that is right for your cat.

  • Your veterinarian wants to keep your pet healthy and the fact is that people who are better informed take better care of their pets. Do not be overwhelmed by “medicalese”. Try your best to understand this foreign language and if you cannot quite decipher it, ask your veterinarian to speak more plainly.

  • Degenerative joint disease is arthritis caused by deterioration and degeneration of tissues lining joints. It is an under-recognized condition in cats. Treatment involves modification of the home environment, regular gentle exercise, anti-inflammatory drugs and other medications, omega fatty acids, chondroprotectants, and possibly other nutraceuticals. Maintaining your cat’s weight can help prevent degenerative joint disease.

Our hospital is accredited by the American Animal Hospital Association (AAHA). Learn more about what this means for you and your pet.

Hospital Hours
Monday8:00am – 6:00pm
Tuesday8:00am – 6:00pm
Wednesday8:00am – 6:00pm
Thursday8:00am – 6:00pm
Friday8:00am – 6:00pm
Saturday8:00am – 12:00pm
SundayClosed

Kimberly Crest Veterinary Hospital
1423 East Kimberly Road
Davenport, Iowa, 52807

Phone: 563-386-1445
Fax: 563-386-5586
Email: [email protected]